Salvador Sobral

SALVADOR Sobral 35 560 x 400 crop

Singer songwriter Salvador Sobral makes his long-awaited London debut. The Lisbon born artist emerged, fully formed, into the spotlight when his breathtaking entry, Amar Pelos Dois (Love Enough for Two), won the Eurovision Song Contest in 2017. Drawing influences from Chet Baker and bossa nova singers such as Brazil’s Caetano Veloso and Chico Buarque, his performance remains the highest scoring in the competition’s history. A simple, sweet and melancholy ballad, as Salvador said afterwards, “Music is not fireworks, music is feeling”. Today it is one of the most popular songs in the Portuguese language in the world. In 2018, when he performed again at Eurovision in a duet with Caetano Veloso, he hinted at the serious musical chops behind his sudden fame.

Sobral sang from a young age, and was seen on television for the first time at the age of ten. In his twenties, he dropped out of psychology studies in order to explore music in Mallorca and later studied jazz in Barcelona. He returned to Portugal at the end of 2014 and began collaborating with some of the country’s biggest jazz artists, creating his first album Excuse Me in 2016.

At the Barbican he will sing from his new album Paris, Lisboa, a multilingual exploration of the two cities inspired by a journey between them. The record is also a homage to Wim Wenders’ classic film ‘Paris, Texas.’ The album was produced by jazz drummer and percussionist Joel Silva, comprising 12 songs and featuring his sister Luísa. Sobral switches between his native Portuguese, Spanish, English, and French throughout, with the record also including a track by the Brazilian samba-canção composer Lupicínio Rodrigues, and another by Francisca Cortesão and Afonso Cabral.

Salvador will be accompanied by musicians Júlio Resende, André Rosina, and Bruno Pedroso.

“The extreme expressiveness of Sobral turns each performance into a unique interpretation.” ABC

“Reminds us that Portuguese is quite possibly the loveliest language in which to sing soft, good, songs.” The Guardian

Age restriction: 5+



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